Larry Kessler
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It’s become a Thanksgiving tradition in my family in recent years to write our annual end-of-the-year newsletter while the turkey is roasting in the oven. Dubbed the “Cains-Kessler … more
Like just about everything we’ve encountered in this year of the coronavirus pandemic – which even the brilliant mind of “Twilight Zone” creator and writer Rod Serling would … more
In the summer of 2019, well before our lives were upended by the seemingly never-ending “new normal,” I wrote a column about how my wife and I were about to become empty-nesters. At that … more
It was just a few months ago, in the early days of the coronavirus pandemic, that families had to come up with alternatives to big Passover seders. Now, with the High Holy Days approaching, many of … more
“My Lord“I pray that these never end,“The sand and the sea,“The rush of the waters,“The light of the heavens,“The prayer of the heart.” – … more
Ever since I was a kid, I’ve been a worrywart. I would often redo my homework in a bid for perfection, and I’d repeatedly study for tests. (Although this resulted in reasonably good grades, it was no help when it came to getting a decent score on the math SAT.) Excessive worrying followed me into adulthood – which is why I started going gray in my 20s. And with that kind of a track record, it’s easy to imagine how being in the midst of a pandemic has intensified my worrying. more
As we head into a summer without many of our favorite activities and events, it might seem a strange time to count our blessings – but it’s worth doing as we strive to maintain a sense of … more
So much has changed since I wrote my first column on the coronavirus pandemic, in mid-March. Back then, we were neophytes at this social-distancing stuff, and we were naively hopeful that this would … more
As I write this in mid-March, uncertainty abounds over the coronavirus pandemic, but one thing is certain: No matter how long the outbreak and its fallout last, it has already hurt the quality of … more
AS I WRITE THIS in mid-March, uncertainty abounds over the coronavirus pandemic, but one thing is certain: No matter how long the outbreak and its fallout last, it has already hurt the quality of our lives, and has made us care more deeply about activities that we otherwise take for granted. Even though most Americans realize it’s a serious situation, it’s hard to accept the severe restrictions imposed on our personal lives because of the virus, especially since past pandemics, including the H1N1 swine flu in 2009-10, never reached this level. For instance, in those other outbreaks, people weren’t thrown out of work, closed off from their schools and houses of worship, or told that they couldn’t patronize bars and restaurants. Not since 9/11 has American life changed so dramatically and so rapidly. more
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